Tuesday, March 8, 2011

Ladybug, Ladybug

"Ladybug, Ladybug, fly away home...your house is on fire, and your children will burn. Except little Nan, who sits in a pan, weaving gold laces as fast as she can!"
I now know for certain that spring is on its way. Yes, I did see a robin and some daffodils blooming, but isn't the real reason I know spring is arriving. And, no it isn't because the time is changing this coming weekend. At my house when spring arrives, the Ladybugs come out to play.
Ladybugs are one of the few insects that actually hibernate during the winter months. I have heard, and read, that they will hibernate in the insulation as well as under the eaves of a house. After consuming aphids during the summer, Ladybugs see shelter for the coming cold months. This can occur in hollow logs, under dead leaves, or in houses....like mine. They like to hang out until the aphids are back in full population mode. At that time they will devote themselves to eating and mating. After their eggs are laid they will die and the cycle will start all over again. Legend has it that the Ladybug, or Lady Beetle, got its name during the Middle Ages. When swarms of insect were damaging crops, the people prayed to the Virgin Mary for help. Soon after the prayers, Ladybugs came and ate the pests, thus saving the crops. The heroic insects were then named, "The Beetles of Our Lady", and over time became known as Lady Beetles and/or Ladybugs. The red wings are known to represent the Virgin's cloak and the black spots are symbols of her joys and sorrows.

Folklore states that if you find a Ladybug in your home you should count its spots. That is how many dollars you will soon obtain.

If you hold a Ladybug in your hand, while making a wish, the direction that is flies away shows where your luck will come from.

Some Asian cultures believe Ladybugs understand human language and have been blessed by God.


In our home they receive the kindest goodbye. A little sweep up in the dust pan and out the door they go.



50 comments:

  1. Love all the info on the Ladybugs and learned a lot from your post. The ones that get in the house drives my wife crazy :).

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  2. They are lovely, aren't they. They're the only bug of any description that I'll say that about.
    Here in the the UK we call them Ladybirds. And here on the Isle of Lewis, where I live, I've yet to see one. And I sure could have done with them when the pesky greenfly were eating my coriander, my peppers, my everything-in-sight. Oh the joys! x

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  3. Well who'da thought. I like them myself, although the Asian versions aren't so popular around here. Swarming, biting and smelling bad as it were....

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  4. I like the lady bugs, too. But not in the house. LOL
    But I always pick them up and take them outside. I love how when you throw them out the door they immediately take flight.

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  5. I think these are the Asian lady beetles that we get here in Nebraska. But, no matter -- the pictures and folklore are lovely. :)

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  6. What an interesting story of the ladybug, thanks for sharing. I'm in Kansas now but last summer when I lived in Illinois there were swarms of ladybugs all over my old farmhouse. I've had enough of them and I'm hoping not to see any out here!

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  7. I say they are a sure sign of spring! Lovely post.

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  8. I really love your blog. It is candy to my eye and mind.

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  9. I did not know any of that, except they hibernate. They are the only flying insect that we don't swat and smash. I love peeking under things outside to see where they are at this time of year. Love them!

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  10. I love the folklore about the ladybug. Nice photos.

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  11. Thank you for the info on Lady Bugs. I didn't know. I have already seen a few as well. It is so wonderful to know spring is almost here.

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  12. This was a great post...I like ladybugs but didn't know a lot about them.

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  13. That is really neat! Thanks for the history and legends of them! I knew they hibernated and were considered good luck charmes. Had no idea about how they got their name. :)

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  14. Such an informative post,very interesting,I also love ladybugs,have never had them in my house yet though. Whoop whoop,soon you can just as gently shove those kids out the door!!! Come on spring!

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  15. Oh, Chick. You are much kinder to these little creatures than I. One is cute. Hundreds? Not so cute. LOL Luckily though, at our new house we've not been swarmed by them as we were at our old place.

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  16. Interesting!
    They seem to be the only bug I don't panic about when I see it crawling on my kitchen windowsill:)

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  17. Ladybugs are one of the few insects I'll pick up or allow to touch my skin! Just the other day my daughter and I went searching for ladybugs {post soon to come} and what fun we had:)

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  18. We love them in our garden. I bought some one year to help out with the aphids. Even my bug phobic girls love these.

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  19. A very interesting post! I can't wait for spring!

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  20. Thanks for all this information. I get many here each spring, but don't know where they go in the summer heat. I will think of you and this post when I see them again.--Inger

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  21. Ohmygosh - how wild?! I did a post about ladybugs today, too!!!! Great minds!

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  22. Ladybugs are sure a sign of Spring around here too. I used to sing that little song you posted when I was little and caught a lady bug!!

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  23. I absolutely love ladybugs. My daddy lives in the country and he has them in the spring and fall. Thanks for sharing such interesting facts about them!

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  24. I love this. Never heard the 2nd part of the Ladybug rhyme before. Other than they eat aphids, I didn't know any of that. I'm going to send this link to all my granddaughters who love ladybugs.
    Infact one of my gd's nickname is Bug for Ladybug. Thanks for sharing.

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  25. I love LadyBugs!
    Though I was not aware of their history.
    How Interesting!
    Thanks for sharing:)

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  26. great post...I love ladybugs...of course I am ladybug from Texas...thanks for making me smile..

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  27. Each fall the lady bugs invade our part of the world in the millions and make an absolute nuisance of themselves. They're so numerous that I've actually considered wearing a mosquito net to mow the yard! If the story about counting the spots is true somebody owes me a bazillion bucks!

    BTW: I could stay here listening to your media player all day!

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  28. Farmchick --I haven't seen a native lady bug in years. All we have are the troublesome Asian type in my area. How wonderful that you still have a few American ones to greet you in the spring. -- barbara

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  29. I love ladybugs! However we're getting snow today!!>.. Stupid groundhog...
    What does it mean when you find a ladybug wing on your 1 year old daughter's tongue?

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  30. Ladybugs are the best. It's always such a pleasant surprise when I see one.

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  31. Take good care of them. Just nudge them away with a slight blow.

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  32. Great post! I have a few of those little ladies right now too. They do seem to come out when the weather gets a bit warmer dont’ they? I didn’t know how royal they were and that they understand what I am saying. I am always nice to them too--who could be mean to such a cute little bugger :)

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  33. I found one on my plants last year, but wasn't able to 'catch' her... with the camera, obviously.

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  34. Lady bugs have wonderful meaning in China and we have always been fond of them since the days of "paperchasing" our sweet Madeleine!

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  35. First, I have to share this link with you on beavers: http://agricultureproud.com/2011/03/09/those-dang-beavers-2/

    Second, there are many kinds of lady bugs, but the ones that will come into your house in MASSIVE amounts are actually another kind of beetle made specifically to eat aphids. They stink when you squish them and bite you when you try to be kind. My dearly departed Uncle Dick called them by a less "lady-like" name that begins with a B.."because real ladies wouldn't stink or bite!"

    I miss the brightly red ladybugs who still hide OUTSIDE near trees. These nasty things in my house, sometimes by the HUNDREDS and I am not exaggerating, are not welcomed.

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  36. I did not know ladybugs hibernate. Very cool. I do notice that they definitely make their presence known in the Spring! They are forever making their way inside the house.

    Great post!!!

    Velva

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  37. I wonder why they're bugs to you and birds to us in the UK?
    Thanks for following my blog - I'm interested to discover yours and will return.

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  38. I do love me some ladybugs....
    We are in the Nursery Business and believe it or not, we actually buy lady bugs from time to time to help us keep all the insects off of the tender leafs....
    Big signs of Spring are all around us here in East Texas..

    Have a great day....
    Shug

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  39. My shop or shed is filled with them at some point in the summer. I assume they are newly hatched ones from thousands of eggs. Anyway, they get hung up on trying to get through the glass to get outside and I put a dust pan behind them and the rubber lip on the dust pan causes them to drop into the dust pan. When I have rescued all of them on one pane of glass I open the door and pitch them outside. I used to buy them from places that sold them and other valuable insects and let them loose in my back yard hopeful that they will protect my plants. It always seemed like they took off and flew over to the neighbors.

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  40. Neat info about the lady bugs. Lots of folks have them in their houses here-I don't. I think they like the sunshine and I live on the North side. Can't wait to tell Paul about the spots-he should be rich soon : )

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  41. We have loads of ladybugs here at the moment which is surprising after such a cold Winter. When I see one I put it in the greenhouse where it's warm, not sure if it's the right thing to do but I sort of feel I would rather be in the greenhouse than out in the cold and wet.

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  42. What a fascinating post about my favorite bugs!!! The beautiful polka dot beauties seem to love my MILoves upstairs.

    God bless and have a remarkable day sweetie!!!

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  43. I find them in my house often....saw one this weekend.
    I didn't know the legends...very interesting!~

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  44. Thanks for the info of these lil bugs.

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  45. I've always heard thst ladybugs were lucky and they and butterflies were my favorite insects. I enjoyed reading the legend about them!

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  46. How interesting. I didn't know ladybugs hibernate. Thank you for sharing. I am glad I stopped by today. I love ladybugs.

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  47. I love this post. Thank you I learned something new today. Great shots too.

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  48. Yay to lady bugs i love them in my garden! They are the best aphid eaters in town and one of the few bugs i dont freak out about when they hang around. Great post!

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  49. We haven't seen any ladybugs yet. I love the folklore about them, I had never heard those before. They are very pretty.

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